BIBLIOGUERILLA

new stuff with old books

twitter.com/bspalmieri:

    boredn0w:

    I

    image

    think

    image

    I might 

    image

    be slightly 

    image

    obsessed… 

    image

    — 2 days ago with 39 notes

    houghtonlib:

    Cigar box labels, late 19th century.

    H 5444.25.3

    Houghton Library, Harvard University

    — 4 months ago with 126 notes
    Wynkyn de Worde Papal Indulgence, ca. 1497. From the University of Edinburgh Image Collections.
"Issued by the papacy as a means of raising money for the pilgrim shrine of St. James, Compostella in Spain."

    Wynkyn de Worde Papal Indulgence, ca. 1497. From the University of Edinburgh Image Collections.

    "Issued by the papacy as a means of raising money for the pilgrim shrine of St. James, Compostella in Spain."

    — 8 months ago with 8 notes
    #indulgence  #incunabula  #wynkyn de worde  #history  #printing 

    Cramps Poster Collection (thx Miss V.)

    (Source: helvete-stoner, via fuckyeahneena)

    — 8 months ago with 1767 notes
    erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

    erikkwakkel:

    Six books, one binding

    Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

    Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

    — 8 months ago with 5107 notes
    #books  #binding 
    wineofwizardry:

Stories of Strange Women (1906), J. Y. F. Cooke, 1906 Read online at archive.org

    wineofwizardry:

    Stories of Strange Women (1906), J. Y. F. Cooke, 1906 Read online at archive.org

    (Source: ghoulnextdoor, via archivalia)

    — 9 months ago with 34845 notes
    Berkley’s Indian Rubber Stamps. Image taken from page 363 of Showell’s Dictionary of Birmingham, part of the British Library’s great image dump of 10 Dec 2013.

    Berkley’s Indian Rubber Stamps. Image taken from page 363 of Showell’s Dictionary of Birmingham, part of the British Library’s great image dump of 10 Dec 2013.

    — 10 months ago with 4 notes
    #stamps  #british library  #advertising 
    Garbage Pail Kids//Drew Tattoo

    Garbage Pail Kids//Drew Tattoo

    — 11 months ago with 2 notes
    #epherma  #trading cards 
    anachoretique:

Unknown - Captain Constantine, 1870
Prince or Captain Constantine was, according to legend, forcibly tattooed by Burmese or Chinese tattoo artists. The tattoos “consisted of 388 symmetrically arranged and closely interwoven images that covered his entire body, including his face, eyelids, ears, and penis. The designs, according to his publicity, consisted of crowned sphinxes, dragons, serpents, monkeys, elephants, leopards, tigers, lions, panthers, gazelles, cats, crocodiles, lizards, eagles, storks, swans, peacocks, owls, fishes, salamanders, men and women, fruit, leaves, and flowers. Most of them were quite small but exceptionally exact in their detail.”
via Paraphilia magazine

    anachoretique:

    Unknown - Captain Constantine, 1870


    Prince or Captain Constantine was, according to legend, forcibly tattooed by Burmese or Chinese tattoo artists. The tattoos “consisted of 388 symmetrically arranged and closely interwoven images that covered his entire body, including his face, eyelids, ears, and penis. The designs, according to his publicity, consisted of crowned sphinxes, dragons, serpents, monkeys, elephants, leopards, tigers, lions, panthers, gazelles, cats, crocodiles, lizards, eagles, storks, swans, peacocks, owls, fishes, salamanders, men and women, fruit, leaves, and flowers. Most of them were quite small but exceptionally exact in their detail.”

    via Paraphilia magazine

    (Source: theplumtree)

    — 11 months ago with 647 notes