The earliest known printed book with illustrations by a woman.
In the bottom right corner you’ll see her initials - ‘G.A.P’ - that’s Geronima Parasole. “a Roman artist, cousin of Isabetta Parasole, who was with Vinciolo and Cesare Vecellio the most important lace designer of the late 16th century. Apart from Geronima’s contribution to the present work, only a few woodcuts by her after designs of Antonio Tempesta are known [The Battle of the Centaursis one]. It seems very likely that this is the earliest known book in which illustrations by a woman are found. In the sixteenth century only 35 women are known to have been artists and according to our researches Geronima and Isabetta Parasole were the only women who contributed to book illustration in the period.” (My Gracious Silence, No. 130)
The work itself is a book on Roman coins throughout Europe by Spanish scholar and Archbishop of Tarragona, Antonio Agostini. (Rome, appresso Guglielmo Faciotto, 1592).

The earliest known printed book with illustrations by a woman.

In the bottom right corner you’ll see her initials - ‘G.A.P’ - that’s Geronima Parasole. “a Roman artist, cousin of Isabetta Parasole, who was with Vinciolo and Cesare Vecellio the most important lace designer of the late 16th century. Apart from Geronima’s contribution to the present work, only a few woodcuts by her after designs of Antonio Tempesta are known [The Battle of the Centaursis one]. It seems very likely that this is the earliest known book in which illustrations by a woman are found. In the sixteenth century only 35 women are known to have been artists and according to our researches Geronima and Isabetta Parasole were the only women who contributed to book illustration in the period.” (My Gracious Silence, No. 130)

The work itself is a book on Roman coins throughout Europe by Spanish scholar and Archbishop of Tarragona, Antonio Agostini. (Rome, appresso Guglielmo Faciotto, 1592).

The Invention of Printing.
Eusebius, Cesarius. Chronicon. (4to. Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 13 Sept 1483.)
The second and last early edition of Eusebius’ timeline of world events. His portion of the chronicle extends to 325 AD (he died in 339), but additions were made by Matteo Palmieri and Bonino Mombriti. In 1457, they credit Gutenberg with the invention of printing…in 1440.
Why didn’t they just put the entry back under 1440? One theory, given what they write, is that they’re accounting for the time it took the technology to spread from Gutenberg to at least Fust and Shoeffer, whose earliest printed works in Mainz are dated to 1457. While Gutenberg’s earliest works are “job lots” like indulgences, and of course the Bible, his invention would have to spread before it was possible for printed books themselves to do so. The spread of printed books across the earth is the focus of the above entry - which claims that a little bit of cash can buy you all of the writings of antiquity.

The Invention of Printing.

Eusebius, Cesarius. Chronicon. (4to. Venice, Erhard Ratdolt, 13 Sept 1483.)

The second and last early edition of Eusebius’ timeline of world events. His portion of the chronicle extends to 325 AD (he died in 339), but additions were made by Matteo Palmieri and Bonino Mombriti. In 1457, they credit Gutenberg with the invention of printing…in 1440.

Why didn’t they just put the entry back under 1440? One theory, given what they write, is that they’re accounting for the time it took the technology to spread from Gutenberg to at least Fust and Shoeffer, whose earliest printed works in Mainz are dated to 1457. While Gutenberg’s earliest works are “job lots” like indulgences, and of course the Bible, his invention would have to spread before it was possible for printed books themselves to do so. The spread of printed books across the earth is the focus of the above entry - which claims that a little bit of cash can buy you all of the writings of antiquity.